ISPS Code pdf Latest Edition Download (2023)

The IMO published the‘Guide to Maritime Security’and the ISPS Code in 2012 to assist in the implementation of the code.However,there havebeen difficultieswith implementationandrecentdebateaboutcontinuing relevanceandkeepingthe code dynamic and adaptable.

Putting the Code to Use

TheISPSCode has given effect to several legal responsibilities forSOLAS contracting governments, as well as vesselsoperatingunder theirflags andwithinportsoftheir jurisdictions.Theseinclude butarenot limited to:

  • Themandatoryappointmentof a PFSO(port facility security officer)
  • The mandatory appointment of aCSO (company security officer)
  • The mandatory appointment of anSSO (shipsecurityofficer)
  • The development of a SSP (ship security plan)
  • APFSP (port facility security plan)
  • The setting of ISPS security levels forportsby relevant authorised persons.

According to theISPSCode, those inthekey security positionsoutlined aboveshould “have knowledge and have received training”.However,the code does not specify what knowledge and training nor how individuals in these positions are certified.Instead, there is a set of additional non-mandatory guidelines that provide more detail:

(Video) ISPS CODE #1/7 - Introduction, Contents & easy to remember trick for contents!

  • Guidanceon training and certification for key security personnel outlining required competencies
  • Required knowledge, understanding and proficiency
  • Methods for demonstrating competence
  • Criteria for evaluating competence

However, this section is non-mandatory and therefore thedegree to which these are implemented fully relies on thecontracting government.Whilstcontracting governmentsare technically not required to adopt these additionalguidelines, the three largest flag states (Marshall Islands, Panama&Liberia – with flagged vessels totalling approximately 40% of global shipping) have all published a list of approved training courses in line with these guidelines for security personnel certification.This means that the code is widely and thoroughly implemented.Also, like the training ofISPSmandated security officers, all flag states have a list of recognised security organizations (RSOs) or a dedicated government authority that are authorised to audit the ship security plan and subsequently issue an international ship security certificate, whichverifiescompliance with the mandatory section (part A) of theISPSCode.This furtheremphasisesthe extent to which the code is implementedand the subsequent impact it has on maritime security.

Where toAdapt?

The strength of theISPSCode lies in the clarity and uniformity it has brought to maritimesecurity. A common understanding of security levels, roles and responsibilities of different security officers, and security procedures has brought together contracting governments, government agencies, local administrations, the shipping and port industries, and other stakeholders in identifying and tackling security threats. This common languagefacilitates powerful cooperation that is guided by a common methodology for ship and port security assessments for each security level. However, this methodology is where the core challenge of the code lies.

TheISPSCode iscurrently limited in its capacitytopre-emptivelyidentifyemergingthreats becausethe code is focused on mitigation measures and post-event response. The primary example of a developing maritime security threat is cybersecurity. In the nearly 20 years since the implementation of theISPSCode, the technology utilised in all commercial industries has changed drastically. Whileincreased capacity, connectivity,monitoring andimproved security measures havedoubtlesslyled to improvements across the shipping industry, they alsopresent new threats.Due to the inherent interconnected nature of the maritime industry, theISPSCode for both ports and vesselshas tobe workable in a space with a wide variety of potentialspill-over risks from industries and companies co-operating with them.This was seen most notablyin cyberspaceinthe NOT PETYA attackwhichoriginatedin asmallUkrainiansoftware companywhosetax filing software serviceda large number ofUkrainian businesses.The attackspilled over intoMaerskthrough their Ukrainian branch whichhadthesoftwareon one of their computers andsimultaneously infiltrated everyconnected device in their network,severely impactingMaersk's systemsworldwide,including their 76 ports and 800 vessels.TheISPSCode is intended to improve security of vessels and port facilities, limitingthe impact of a security incident ifit happens andto maintain functionality of systemsin the event of an incident. A cyber-attacknowhas thepotentialto severely compromise bothphysical security and operability of ports and vessels.To address this vulnerability, theInternational Association of Ports and Harbours (IAPH) in cooperation withWorldBankhasrecentlysubmittedcybersecurity guidelines to the IMO for consideration.Whilst thisis a step in the right directionfortheindustry to self-implement improvements,ithighlights the importance ofintroducingamore formalprocess that continuously assesses whether theISPSCode is up to date and coherent withemerging risk factors,such as cybersecurity.

(Video) Security Awareness - Ship Security

A furtheropportunity for theISPSCode to adapt is to account for greater reactivity when faced with certain traditional threats,such asinteractions with hostile foreign militariesand/or state backedhostile groups. The port MARSEC levels of the code are determined by the authority of the country they arein, withvisitingvessel masters either matching the portISPSsecurity level or, if the vesselsISPSsecurity level is higher than the ports,issuinga Declaration of Security.This process can be hindered or compromised in countries without a functioning government or designated authorities, as was seen during the Libyan Civilwar.An example of this occurred in 2014,whenLibya’sPort of Benghazi was assessed to be non-compliant and continued to operate during significant onshore violence, recent airstrikes to the port, and the stated intent by General Haftar to shell ships that entered the port.Despite the clear and imminent threatto operations and personnel,thePort authoritywereunabletoimplement adequate and proportionate maritime security measures inporttoprotectfacilitiesand visiting vessels,asmilitias had taken over control of the port.

Athirdlimitation of theISPSCodeconnectstohow the codetreats the security impactsof goods in ports.TheISPSCode mandates thatthe port security assessmentaccountsfor the identification of potential targets and weaknesses relating to the transport of goods, including explosive and dangerous material, which may be located and/or stored in a port at some point.Ithighlights theimportanceof recognisingand implementing security measures around threats toandfromdangerous materials,however italsoemphasisestheresponsibility ofports and contracting governments to ensure adequate implementation.Despite the requirement for constant assessment of security measures and risks,it is notfeasible forholisticport security to bereassessed every time new cargo arrives.This explains whythe security assessment of transiting cargopredominately accountsfor stationary risk, rather than transitory and adaptive threats.

A fourthlimitationisthat thethree levels ofISPS do not adequately account for the nuance of the multidimensional and varying nature of risk that ports and vesselsface.For example, there have been several tit-for-tat incidents involving explosions with UAVs and WBIEDs in the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman between Iran and Israel, and whilstthis may prompt a higher ISPS level, vessels that are not affiliatedwithIsrael and Iran have no reason to operate at a higher risk posture.Similarly,when entering a high-risk areaand implementing a higher level of ISPS onboard, vesselswouldimplementhard lockdown measures,and whilst this partially mitigates the risk of piracy,thisis not an effective deterrent for WBIED and UAV attacks.This highlights the importance of considering the nature of the threat a vessel might face.Vessels operate under ISPS levels set by theirFlagStates when underway,and whilst these three levels provideusefulbaseline threat mitigation, their one-size-fits-all nature isill-equippedto holistically assess and mitigate the risk during a transit. Individual ISPS certifications cannot account for every security scenario thatavessel may encounter at ports around the world without supplementary adviceaboutthe local situation prior to transit.

The final limitation of the ISPS Code relates to its core objective of supporting the “early and efficient collation and exchange of maritime security-relatedinformation at national, regional and international levels”. Without centralised and accessible information regarding the current ISPS levels in ports, the ability for all parties to adequately prepare and implement the appropriate security measures onboard visitingvesselsis limited, with ISPS only being advised on approach to the port.

(Video) ISPS Code Regulations

Security inPractice

TheISPSCode has made asignificant,positivedifference to maritime security, bringingabout formalised and standardised maritime security for ships and ports with clear enforcement systems and extensive guidelines for implementation, regulation, and designation of responsibility. However,in its current form,the code does not adequately account for thenuance of themultidimensional,varying,and evolving nature of risk in the maritime industry.Thisis less the result of inadequate planning, but reflective of theever-evolvingnature of risk.Informed parties would be hard pushed to debate the legitimacy of theISPSCode, however increasingly there are questions regarding its relevance within the contemporary security environment.

Centralised and accessible documentation of the currentISPSlevel at ports internationally could, for example,assist the IMO in including all parties involved in maritime security concerns, including vessel owners and companiestoensurethe safety ofplannedoperations and transits.Given the significance of theISPSCodein being the centraltenetaround which much oftoday’smaritime security framework is based, itremains vital for the document to continue to reflect the contemporary security environmentthat it seeks to mitigate against.It has been nearly 20 years since theISPSCode was adopted, and in that time significant changes have occurred in the maritime industry, particularlywith respect tocybersecurityconcernsgiving rise tolegitimate questions as to the contemporary relevance of this framework.With areformed,reflexive,andup-to-dateISPSCode, all actors can play their part in ensuringthat global maritime shippingisasafer place for all thoseinvolved.

(Video) ISPS Training Video

FAQs

What is the latest edition of the ISPS Code? ›

Guide to Maritime Security and the ISPS Code (2021 Edition)

What is the ISPS Code PDF? ›

The ISPS Code provides a framework for the assessment and detection of possible security threats to ships or port facilities. It applies to vessels engaged in international voyages including passenger vessels, cargo vessels of 500 gross tonnage and above, mobile offshore drilling units, and port facilities.

How many chapters are in ISPS Code? ›

The International Ship and Port Facility (ISPS) Code

The Code is divided into two sections, Part A and Part B.

What is level 3 of ISPS? ›

Security level 3 means the level for which further specific protective security measures shall be maintained for a limited period of time when a security incident is probable or imminent, although it may not be possible to identify the specific target.

Who regulates ISPS Code? ›

The Maritime Security and MLC Branch

The Branch provides technical advice and guidance to make sure that SOLAS Chapter XI-2 and ISPS Code are consistently applied and maintained.

What is ISPS security level? ›

ISPS Security Level 1 – average – the level at which the ships and port facilities operate under normal conditions. Minimum protective measures will be maintained at all times. Security Level 2 – heightened – this level will apply whenever there is a heightened risk of a security incident.

What is Chapter 11 in SOLAS? ›

SOLAS Chapter XI is a mixture of assorted Regulations, some covering safety, and some security. Hidden within this Chapter are some important Regulations that may be expected to be contained in other parts of SOLAS.

Who created ISPS? ›

In this context, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) launched the ISPS, whose immediate further development in Europe resulted in the entry into force in July 2004 of Regulation (EC) No. 725/2004 of the European Parliament and of the Council on enhancing ship and port facility security.

What is Doc in ISPS Code? ›

A Declaration of Security (DOS) is a declaration that addresses the security requirements that could be shared between a port facility and a ship (or between ships) and will state the responsibility for security each shall take. It is an agreement between both partieS.

What are the 3 levels of security? ›

There are three primary areas or classifications of security controls. These include management security, operational security, and physical security controls.

Who sets security level of ship? ›

Ship security plan

ISPS code part A/9.4 gives the minimum points that must be included in the ship security plan. Ship security plan need to be approved by flag state of the vessel or by Recognised security organisation (RSO) on behalf of flag state. RSO is usually the classification society of the vessel.

What is CSO in shipping? ›

The company security officer (CSO) would arrange for internal audits and reviews of security activities. On the basis of various observations and results from the ship security assessment, the company security officer would make developments in the ship's security plan.

What is ISM in shipping? ›

International Safety Management (ISM) Code : the International Management Code for the Safe Operation of Ships and for Pollution Prevention as adopted by the Assembly, as may be amended by the Organization.

Who are the key players in ISPS? ›

Personnel involved with the implementation of the security requirements onboard are: Company Security Officer (CSO) who is responsible of ISPS implementation within Company and managed fleet; Ship Security Officer (SSO) who is responsible of ISPS and approved Ship Security Plan implementation on board and the; Master ...

What is ship safety? ›

Maritime safety is the protection of the crew and passengers aboard vessels, as well as those living or working near bodies of water, from hazards and the risk of injury or fatality.

What is the purpose of ISPS? ›

The main aim of the International Code for the Security of Ships and of Port Facilities (ISPS) is as follows: To monitor the activity of people and cargo operation. To detect the different security threats onboard vessel and in port and implement the measure as per the situation.

What is ISM and ISPS Code? ›

The ISM code -International Safety Management Code- has been created to manage safety in a shipping company and on board its ships. The ISPS code (international ship and Port facility securitry code) has been created to manage the security of the ships and the port facilities frequented by them.

Why is ISPS Code important? ›

The main objectives of the ISPS Code include: enables the detection and deterrence of security threats within an international framework. establishes roles and responsibilities. enables collection and exchange of security information.

What are the 3 elements of Gmdss? ›

GMDSS equipment is required to be powered from three sources of supply: ship's normal alternators/generators; ship's emergency alternator/generator (if fitted); and. a dedicated radio battery supply.

What is ISPS Code for ships? ›

International Ship and Port Facility Security Code. Entered in force on 1st July 2004 (SOLAS Chap. XI-2), the ISPS Code is a comprehensive set of measures to enhance the security of ships and port facilities.

What is Solas in maritime? ›

The International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) is an important international treaty concerning the safety of merchant ships. It ensures that ships registered by signatory States comply with minimum safety standards in construction, equipment and operation of ships.

What are the 4 pillars of IMO? ›

The four pillars of IMO are the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW), International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL) and Maritime Labour Convention (MLC).

What is CSR record? ›

In short and plain language, the CSR is a record of ship's history. It is a record that remains with the ship for its entire service. When chapter XI-2 (special measures to enhance maritime security) was introduced in SOLAS, a new regulation (regulation 5) concerning CSR was introduced in chapter XI-1 of the SOLAS.

What is SOLAS Chapter IV? ›

SOLAS Chapter IV

Radio communications: This chapter Includes requirements of different radio communication equipment used on board ships, such as GMDSS, SART, EPIRB etc., for cargo and passenger vessels.

What is SSP in ship? ›

The ship security plan (SSP) is developed on the base of a ship security assessment (SSA). The company security officer (CSO) is responsible for the preparation of a risk assessment and possibly for its updating.

Does ISPS certificate expire? ›

This certificate does not expire. However for good practice please stay update with security practices at work and generally.

What are the the three 3 objectives of ISM Code? ›

1 The objectives of the Code are to ensure safety at sea, prevention of human injury or loss of life, and avoidance of damage to the environment, in particular, to the marine environment, and to property.

Who will issue the ISSC? ›

8 Upon receipt of recommendation from the nominated surveyor, the Directorate shall issue ISSC and the CSR to the vessel.

What is ship damage control plan? ›

The damage control plan and damage control booklet, which are required by SOLAS regulation II 1/19, are intended to provide ships' officers with clear information on the ship's watertight subdivision and equipment related to maintaining the boundaries and effectiveness of the subdivision so that, in the event of damage ...

What does BMP stand for in shipping? ›

Piracy-specific Best Management Practice (BMP), international navies and capacity building ashore have helped to suppress piracy. However, Somali piracy has not been eradicated and remains a threat. The BMP contained in this publication mitigates the risk from piracy and other maritime security threats.

What is ISPS shipping code? ›

What is the ISPS Code? ISPS or the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code is an essential maritime regulation for the safety and security of ships, ports, cargo and crew. The biggest challenge the world is facing today is fighting terrorism.

What are the contents of ISPS Code Part A and Part B? ›

ISPS Code is divided into two sections: Part A, which is a mandatory section, includes the maritime and port security-related requirements which should be followed respectfully by the governments, port authorities and shipping companies, while Part B provides guidelines on how to meet these requirements.

What is continuous synopsis record CSR of ships? ›

The continuous synopsis record provides an onboard record of the history of the ship with respect to the information recorded therein. Continuous synopsis record (CSR) is issued by the administration of the ship, which would fly its flag.

What are the 3 levels of security? ›

There are three primary areas or classifications of security controls. These include management security, operational security, and physical security controls.

Who created ISPS? ›

In this context, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) launched the ISPS, whose immediate further development in Europe resulted in the entry into force in July 2004 of Regulation (EC) No. 725/2004 of the European Parliament and of the Council on enhancing ship and port facility security.

What is Chapter 11 in Solas? ›

SOLAS Chapter XI is a mixture of assorted Regulations, some covering safety, and some security. Hidden within this Chapter are some important Regulations that may be expected to be contained in other parts of SOLAS.

What is RSO in shipping? ›

As a Recognized Security Organization (RSO) for a number of flag administrations, we review / approve ship security plans and undertake ISPS Code verification audits on ships, leading to the issuance of an ISPS Code Certificate for your ship.

Who are the key players in ISPS? ›

Personnel involved with the implementation of the security requirements onboard are: Company Security Officer (CSO) who is responsible of ISPS implementation within Company and managed fleet; Ship Security Officer (SSO) who is responsible of ISPS and approved Ship Security Plan implementation on board and the; Master ...

Who decides security level of ship? ›

Ship security plan

ISPS code part A/9.4 gives the minimum points that must be included in the ship security plan. Ship security plan need to be approved by flag state of the vessel or by Recognised security organisation (RSO) on behalf of flag state. RSO is usually the classification society of the vessel.

Who is responsible for the SSP? ›

It's paid by your employer for up to 28 weeks. This guide is also available in Welsh (Cymraeg). You must be eligible for SSP .

What is CSR document? ›

The purpose of the CSR is to provide an onboard record of the history of the vessel with respect to its flag, owner, operator, charterer, classification society, safety management, and security activities. CSR Desk. Only the ship's Administration can issue a ship's CSR document.

What is the minimum interval between ship security drills? ›

Security drills are to be held on board at least once every three months to promote the effective implementation of the Ship Security Plan. If more than 25% of the crew is changed at any one time, the new joiners are to take part in a security drill within their first week on board.

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